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2 edition of Family relationships and delinquent behavior. found in the catalog.

Family relationships and delinquent behavior.

Francis Ivan Nye

Family relationships and delinquent behavior.

by Francis Ivan Nye

  • 127 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Wiley in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Juvenile delinquency

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHV9069 N9
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 168 p.
    Number of Pages168
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17296766M

      The Influence of Family Structure on Delinquent Behavior Show all authors. Cashen M. Boccio 1. Comparatively less research has attempted to examine the long-term impact of shifts in family structure on delinquent and criminal involvement. The effects of family type, family relationships and parental role models on delinquency and Author: Cashen M. Boccio, Kevin M. Beaver, Kevin M. Beaver. The Relationship between Juvenile Delinquency and Family Unit Structure By definition, an intact home is a two-parent (one male, one female) structure. Any deviation from this, regardless of reason (e.g., death, divorce, separation or desertions) is classified as broken (Wilkinson, ). An intact home is .

    The purpose of this paper was to examine the following question: What is the relationship between parental interest and control over their adolescent children, and juvenile delinquency? Two hypotheses were tested: (1) fewer adolescents who report greater parental control will report engaging in delinquent behavior than adolescents who report less parental control; and (2) fewer adolescents who Cited by: 1. In addition to gathering information concerning pertinent historical information (e.g., the behavior that precipitated the adolescent’s criminal charges, family and academic histories, peer relationships, patterns of substance abuse, etc.), the trained clinicians administered measures of violent delinquency, parental disciplinary practices Cited by:

      F. I. Nye, Family Relationships and Delinquent Behavior. New York, J. Wiley & Sons, Inc., London, Chapman & Hall, Limited, , XII p. p., - Volume 26 Issue 8. Family Problems Experienced by Students of the University of Jordan Article (PDF Available) in European Scientific Journal 12(13) January w Reads How we measure 'reads'.


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Family relationships and delinquent behavior by Francis Ivan Nye Download PDF EPUB FB2

Family Relationships and Delinquent Behavior (German) Hardcover – January 1, by F. Ivan Nye (Author)Author: F. Ivan Nye. Family Relationships and Delinquent Behavior by F Ivan Nye (Author) › Visit Amazon's F Ivan Nye Page.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author. Are you an author. Learn about Author Family relationships and delinquent behavior.

book. F Ivan Nye (Author) ISBN ISBN Cited by: Excerpt. The problem of definition and measurement has long been a difficult one in delinquency research. Most investigators, after expressing more or fewer misgivings, have elected to consider official records, or even more frequently, institutionalization as the criterion.

A reformatory or training school population is usually accepted as a delinquent group and a non-institutionalized group is taken as. Access to society journal content varies across our titles. If you have access to a journal via a society or association membership, please browse to your society journal, select an article to view, and follow the instructions in this : Herbert A.

Bloch. Try the new Google Books. Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features. Try it now. No thanks. Try the new Google Books Get print book. No eBook available Family Relationships and Delinquent Behavior.

Francis Ivan Nye. Wiley, - Juvenile delinquency - pages. 0 Reviews. Abstract. Family interaction and attachment assume prominent roles in social control theories of delinquency.

However, the degree of conceptualization and the measurement strategies generally employed arguably are inadequate to capture the real dynamic quality of such relationships and to specify their effects on delinquency by: mechanisms: Maternal behavior appears to influence juvenile delinquency and, through those eflects, adult [email protected]

Paternal interaction with the family, however, appears to have a more direct influence on the probability of adult criminal behavior. THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVE Historically, family interactions have been assumed to influence criminal.

likelihood of delinquent behavior and the protective factors that enhance positive adolescent development. The composition of families is one aspect of family life that is consistently associated with delinquency. Children who live in homes with only one parent or in which marital relationships have been disrupted by divorce or separationFile Size: 51KB.

Complex causes of juvenile delinquency, many papers discuss various aspects, including physical, psychological factors, family factors, school factors, social factors and diversity into account; including family structure and family relationships interact with youth of deviant : Wang Qiang.

Finally, delinquent behaviors were assessed at ages 13 as well as age 10 for control purposes, with self-reports. Results showed that boys' disruptiveness profiles during childhood, attachment to parents, and attitude toward delinquency moderated the link between best friend's deviancy and later delinquent by: Buy Family Relationships and Delinquent Behavior.

New ed of ed by Nye, F. Ivan, Nye, Francis Ivan (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Author: F. Ivan Nye, Francis Ivan Nye. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Nye, F. Ivan (Francis Ivan), Family relationships and delinquent behavior. New York: Wiley ; London: Chapman & Hall.

behavior, the report moves on to consider the role of early experiences with parents and family on subsequent delinquent and criminal behavior. Children who are rejected by their parents, grow up in homes with considerable conflict, and are inadequately supervised are at greatest risk of becoming delinquents.

The results suggest two mechanisms: Maternal behavior appears to influence juvenile delinquency and, through those effects, adult criminality.

Paternal interaction with the family, however, appears to have a more direct influence on the probability of adult criminal by: CHAPTER 10 Family Influences on Delinquency low school achievement.

In contrast, abusive parents and broken homes were relatively weak is clear that some family factors are at least as important in the prediction of offending as are gender and Size: 1MB. The current study examined how family relationships and risk behaviors relate to self-reported delinquency among adolescents.

The primary goals were to determine the amount of variance in delinquent behavior that can be accounted for by risk behaviors, and to examine how a modified version of the coercion theory of delinquent behavior fits the.

Alltucker, Bullis, Close and Yovanoff () examined the relationship between “foster care experience, family criminality, special education disability, and socioeconomic status” (p. ) and the age at which youths become involved in delinquent behaviors. The literature examining the link between family structure and delinquent behavior has tended to focus on the attachment component of social bond theory (formerly known as Social Control Theory).

It has been assumed that this component is most strongly influenced by family structure. This section will first consider factors within the family that have been found to be associated with the development of delinquency and then consider peer influences on delinquent behavior.

Note that issues concerning poverty and race are dealt with under the community factors section of this chapter. Research has identified other factors at the community, family, and individual levels that influence the development of delinquent and/or aggressive behaviors, including the availability of criminogenic tools (e.g., weapons), community disorganization, family history of problem behavior, family conflict, and a history of early antisocial.

Juvenile Delinquency and Family Structure: Implications for Marriage and Relationship Education. 4. families (Harper & McLanahan, ).

Others have. found that children of divorced parents are up to six times more likely to be delinquent than children from intact families (Larson, Swyers & Larson, ).

Boys raised without their fathers were File Size: KB.According to Huey, Henggeler, Brondino, and Pickrel (), positive changes in family interpersonal relationships tend to reduce delinquent peer affiliation and delinquent behavior in general.Thus, while Hirschi and Cernkovich and Giordano differed on the importance of "intimate" communication, they agreed that "types" of family communication are important for understanding delinquency.

The focus of the current study is on adolescents' self-reported delinquent behavior and two types of family communication - open and problem.